Blog

Keep up to date with our News, Tips & Specials

Our in-store specials this week are:

  • 20% off Balled & Burlap Trees, Shrubs, Aspen & Container Evergreens
  • 50% off Fall Bulbs & Garlic
  • 50% Container Deciduous Trees, Carol Mackie Daphne, & Select Evergreens on a Standard
  • 50% off Pottery, Statuary & Fountains
  • 50% off Garden Flags & Sundials

The ground temperature needs to drop a little bit more before we plant fall bulbs, but the selection is excellent right now. The best time to plant fall bulbs would be the end of September through October, as the soil temperature has dropped and you can plant right up until the ground freezes in November.   By planting in September and October, you allow the bulbs to become well-rooted before the ground freezes.  

The ground temperature needs to drop a little bit more before we plant fall bulbs, but the selection is excellent right now. The best time to plant fall bulbs would be the end of September through October, as the soil temperature has dropped and you can plant right up until the ground freezes in November.   By planting in September and October, you allow the bulbs to become well-rooted before the ground freezes.  

Proper watering can promote a deeply rooted, healthier lawn. Summer conditions such as hot, dry and windy days can dictate watering practices. During these hot summer days we know that a healthy lawn of bluegrass needs 2.25” of water each week. Each time you water, it is important to moisten the root zone of your lawn. With a small shovel or soil probe you can take a look at your root zone to see the depth. A healthy bluegrass lawn would have a good, deep 6” depth on its root system. If the lawn root depth is 6” then you would moisten to 6”.

Bluegrass Care Tips

Proper watering can promote a deeply rooted, healthier lawn. Summer conditions such as hot, dry and windy days can dictate watering practices. During these hot summer days we know that a healthy lawn of bluegrass needs 2.25” of water each week. Each time you water, it is important to moisten the root zone of your lawn. With a small shovel or soil probe you can take a look at your root zone to see the depth. A healthy bluegrass lawn would have a good, deep 6” depth on its root system. If the lawn root depth is 6” then you would moisten to 6”.

Dividing Irises

Irises are best divided in the fall. It is safe to divide them now until frost. When irises become crowded they will no longer bloom, so dividing them helps with overcrowding. It is important to inspect the tubers and make sure they don’t have any insect problems and that they aren’t diseased after you dig them up and before you replant. Cut the foliage down to about 3’ before planting. Remember that irises don’t like to be planted too deep. In fact, the top of the tuber should be showing. Give them plenty of room to grow!

July is a great month to get things done around the yard:

-This is the last month we really recommend fertilizing the trees and shrubs, as they need time to harden off before winter. So if you haven’t done it yet, there is still time.

-Dead head (cut of the spent flowers) on your perennials and roses. Then fertilize them to get them blooming again.

-Check the drip system and make sure all the emitters are working properly.

-Prune trees and shrubs if needed.

-Plant a few new perennials for added flower power.

If you live in Colorado, you probably can appreciate the importance of shade that a tree can provide. Do you really understand the importance of trees? Trees absorb carbon dioxide and provide us with the oxygen we breathe. Trees also provide sources of timber, food, essential oils, gums, resins, latex, medicines, as well as wonderful cooling shade.

It has been wonderful to experience a real spring again. The plants have really enjoyed the moisture. It was a slow start, but it has been more like spring traditionally should be.  I have really enjoyed watching everything come to life with such vigor.

It is time to get things in good health. Fertilizing trees, shrubs, perennials and lawns should be done now.

I don’t know about you, but the winter we have been having this spring is really starting to affect my gardening habit. I am so ready to get things going in my garden and this weather has really put a hold on things. I have potatoes, onions, lettuce, peas and carrots in my garden. Last year I had everything in my veggie garden planted by now and it was thriving.

The moisture has been awesome and I haven’t had to water my lawn yet - so I should be grateful for that, right?

Pages